Genealogy Data Page 71 (Notes Pages)

For privacy reasons, Date of Birth and Date of Marriage for persons believed to still be living are not shown.

Pennington, Richard (b. 1748, d. ?)

Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
Time: 11:28:24

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Pennington, Timothy (b. 1749, d. BET 1820 1826)
Death: BET 1820 1826 Monroe Co KY
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
Time: 11:28:24

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Pennington, Jemima (b. 1760, d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
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Pennington, Joshua (b. 1760, d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
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Pennington, Robert (b. 1761, d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
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Boone, Hannah (b. 22 AUG 1746, d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
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Riggs, Nancy (b. , d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
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Pennington, Ehpraim (b. 1689, d. ?)
Note: Note: Pennington Research Associates: On 28 Apr 1762, he was exempted from paying taxes or doing public service, probably for age or infirmity, which would make him about 70 with a birth date about 1692. Per "Dozens of Cousins": to Rowan Co., NC by 1750.
Change: Date: 20 MAR 2004
Time: 12:30:44

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Greene, Polly (b. , d. 1777)
Death: 1777
Change: Date: 27 OCT 2002
Time: 12:49:39

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Boling, John E. (b. 1777, d. 1838)
Note: The daughter of John E. Boling and Susan Sizemore married Jesse Combs, first County Clerk of Perry Co., KY. They were married by Rev. Jesse Boling
Death: 1838
Change: Date: 24 JUN 2003
Time: 10:47:57

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Sizemore, Susan (b. , d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
Time: 11:28:24

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Bolin, Benjamin Jr (b. 30 JUN 1734, d. ?)
Note: BIOGRAPHY: There is quite a bit of controversy over whether or not this Benjamin Boling/Bolling/Bowling actually belongs here or if he is from another line, and not a blood line of Pocahontas. I have seen a lot of "documentation" from both sides, agree that there is some question -- actually I question whether or not this man actually fathered some twenty-two children. However, my own grandchildren were intrigued at the possibility of being the 13th great grandchildren of Pocahontas, especially since they thought she was a Disney cartoon character! It sparked an interest in genealogy and in history. I made a slide presentation on a disc for them showing each generation, with photos (if I had them) and with examples of how the people of that generation would have looked when I didn't. It turned out great since some of the generations participated in the Revolutionary War, some the Civil War, the French and Indian War, etc... It turned out to be quite a lesson in American History. For that, it was worth stretching the documentation a bit.

It is known that he served with Col. Washington in the French and Indian Wars.

BENJAMIN BOLLING (1734-1832)
Benjamin Bolling born June 30, 1734 has proved to be a mystery to the legions of descendants seeking to prove definitively the identity of his parents. One fact that most researchers agree on is that Benjamin on 20 Jun 1753 married Patsy/Pattie Phelps/Felts in Albermarle County, Virginia. Pasty/Pattie was born in 1737 in Albermarle County Virginia and died on 8 Mar 1767 in Rowan County, North Carolina due to complications arising from the birth of daughter, Elizabeth. Benjamin later married Charity Larrimore. Most researchers agree that he was born in Henrico County, Virginia and moved to North Carolina while a young man. From North Carolina, he and his family moved to Wise Co., VA in 1794. He soon became dissatisfied and moved back to North Carolina.

In about 1820, he accompanied his son, Jeremiah, and his family to Wise Co. where he remained until his death on 20 Jan 1832. He is buried in the Ben Bolling Cemetery, Flat Gap, Wise County, Virginia. Later descendants erected a marker near the location of his grave. (The History of the Pound, edited by Rhonda Robertson and Nancy Clark Brown, 1993.)
According to a generic Bolling database provided by Ken Poole through the Baker-Bolin mailing list, the children of Benjamin Bolling and Patsy/Pattie Phelps/Felts were:
Benjamin Bolling, Jr.
William Bolling born about 1755 in Henrico County, Virginia
John Bolling born about 1756 in Henrico County, Virginia
Jesse Bolling born on 22 May 1758 in Orange County, North Carolina
David Bolling born about 1764
Hannah Bolling
Levi Bolling
Elizabeth Bolling born on 8 Mar 1767 in Rowan County, North Carolina.
According to Harley Tucker Bolling in his book, The Bolling Family of Eastern Kentucky, Benjamin was the son of Jonathan Bolling II and Elizabeth Blair. He attributed the following children to Benjamin and his two wives:
Benjamin Bolling b 25 Apr 1754 married Sarah Hancock
John Bolling b 1755
Jesse Bolling/Bowling b 22 May 1758 married first Polly Green and second Mary Pennington
Justice Bolling married Pattie Baker
William Bolling/Bowling born 1757(?)
Delaney Bolling born 1764
Hannah Bolling born 1766 married Solomon Osborne
Elizabeth Bolling born 1767 married William Short
Jeremiah Bolling born 7 Feb 1782 married Sarah "Sallie" Ward
Five other people were listed as possible children including: Charity, Bennett, Isaac, Levi, and James.
According to Judge Zelma Wells Price in her work, Of Whom I Came, From Whence I Came, states that Benjamin was the son of Major John Bolling and Elizabeth Blair, was married at least twice and moved from VA to NC in 1760 and later from NC back to VA. The following children were identified as belonging to Benjamin Bolling and Pattie Felts:
John
Jesse
William
Benjamin married Sallie Hancock
Hannah Bolling married Solomon Osborne

The following child was identified as a son of Benjamin and Charity Larrimore:
Jeremiah married Sallie Ward
According to e-mails from the BFA, evidence exists which prove that Benjamin was not the son of Major John Bolling but was descended from Edward Bolling. Edward Bolling (1687-1710) was the son of Robert Bolling and Anne Stith. He married a Slaughter girl at a very young age and made his living at sea. A letter from a Col. Byrd mentions that he recently lost two of his "beautiful young men" at sea one of whom was Edward.
Edward's widow took her family to North Carolina including her son Benjamin who married Charlotte Ward and later fathered Benjamin (1734-1832).
As this quick review of the existing literature reveals, very few proven facts are available to positively identify Benjamin, his parents, and descendants. Perhaps a search and compilation of census and court records would help separate facts about this Benjamin Bolling (1734-1832) from others of the same name including his son, Benjamin Bolling, II and provide firm evidence for his parents.
If you have any additional information regarding this Benjamin Bolling, please e-mail me at Martha Short
Webpage of what we know about Benjamin Bolling II b. 1754 <benbolling!!.html>
Martha Short 1998 All Rights Reserved. Material on this website is provided for your personal use as long as the copyright information is noted and a mention of where you obtained the material is on the copied material. Please do not copy this material as your own. Please do not publish this material as your own. Please do not download these files for inclusion in another website. Webmasters may link to this site or any portion thereof, but please be kind and send me an email notifying me of your intention. Thank You! marthas@naxs.com

Usa Note:
I found this information in one of the Ancestral News in Clay Co., Ky Check this out again for exact information. Benjamin settled on the Pound in now Wise Co. VA about 1789. He and Pattie had 7 children.

Benjamin and Dorothea were twins.

When Benjamin, 1734, left North Carolina to return to Virginia he moved to Flat Gap in what is now Wise Co., VA. near the Kentucky and Tennessee borders. He died there in 1832 at age 98 and is buried in the Bolling family cemetery there. His second wife, Charity Larrimore whom he married after Patsy Felts (Jesse's Mother) died in childbirth on 8 Mar 1767, is buried beside him. Benjamin and Charity had Jeremiah and possibly other children. This Jeremiah was the great-great grandfather of Pennington cousin Rev. C. Glenn Bowling, and is also the ancestor of E. Watson Bolling, author ot "The Bolling Descendants of John Rolfe and Pochahontas.

Benjamin and Patti lived in Wilkes Co., N. C., then back to VA.. They had 9 children and then Benjamin and Charity had 10 children. (From Microfilm # 1502551 item 33 at the FH Library S.L.City Utah)

From Turley:

It is believed that the Bollings moved to NC between the years 1730-1789 from eastern virginia. it was recorded in the first Federal Census that Benjamin Bolling, son of John and Elizabeth lived in Wilkes Co., NC in 1770.
When Benjamin settled in what is now Wise County, Virginia, there were no roads, only Indian trails and animal paths. He settled in an area now known as Esserville, Virginia. An old chimney stood for many years which was believed to have belonged to Benjamin. It was located where the Rocky Forks empties into Guest River. Upon his arrival it is said that he declared, "all the land I can see is mine," and thereby became a land owner or squatter. It has been said that Benjamin believed that to live in the mountains, walled in, would make him free from religious and political examination.

Benjamin, as all white settlers, feared the Indians, although he was never attacked. In this particular area, he felt that he was fairly safe, however, incidences regarding a family by the name of Roberts was said to have influenced Benjamin's return to North Carolina. These incidences were in regard to Indian raids involving this family and others. The Roberts family and some of his in-laws had unknowingly moved and settled within five miles of chief Benge and his tribe. This was a nearby area now know as Robert's Branch. It was said that Robert's small son had seen some Indians nearby. He told his father about it and said that if they should come that he was going to hide under the trunk of an old tree, under the branch, where the water had washed the dirt from around it. Roberts gathered his sons-in-law for a battle with the Indians. The Indians attacked at night. It was said that Roberts yelled, "why don't you wait until daylight and fight like white men." They said the young Roberts boy did just as he said and hid under the trunk of the tree near the branch. The Roberts dog attacked an Indian and pulled him over the tree trunk where the boy was hiding. Apparently the Indian did not see him. the Roberts man was killed during the attack. The family buried him under a large chestnut tree. They cut the tree and scattered chestnut burrs so the Indians would think they had cut it for the chestnuts.

It is said that the first raid Chief Benge's Tribe made was either in Russell or Scott county. Two girls were captured and taken back to the tribe. The girls, they said, kept a keen eye on the way and later escaped. they told that they hid behind a fallen tree and that the Indians came so close looking for them that they could hear them talking. They arrived safely home.

The last known raid that Chief Benge and his warriors made was in Southwest Virginia in 1794. They raided and burned the Peter and Henry Livingston homes on Holston River, capturing two of the Livingston women. They traveled northward through an area called Wildcat, East Stone Gap, Powell Valley, across Stone Mountain turning right at Hoot-owl Hollow.

Jess Brock (1751-1843) organized a posse and went after the Indians. They took a shortcut across the High Knob Mountain and waited for Chief Benge. On the way to High Knob, an area now called Ice Plant Hallow, near a large rock, Jess and his possee killed Chief Benge. The rock is now called Benge Rock. The Livingston women were rescued. It was believed at that time that Benge's Tribe was located at the head of the Cumberland River in Kentucky. The tribe was thought to have migrated back to the Smoky Mountains in Tennessee. They had heard that Benge had a half brother, who was said to be the chief of a tribe there.

___________________________________
The Bolling Settlement

Location: First on east side of US 23; five miles west of Wise. Second on South Fork of Pound; eight miles west of Pound. Third, at Flat Gap on North Fork of Pound. Date: First 1794. Second about 1810. Third about 1825. Description: See history. History: Benjamin Bolling moved from North Carolina in 1794 and settled about two miles north of present town of Esserville, on state road 620. One son, Jeremiah, then a small boy, and his wife accompanied him here. He lived here in a small cabin he built, for two years, when he sold his claim to another homeseeker and moved back to North Carolina. In 1810, or thereabouts, Jeremiah Bolling was married to Sally Ward of Georgia, and remembering the Cumberland Mountains decided to seek hunting ground and a home in the wilderness. So he set out, accompanied by his father, then very aged, and established himself on a claim on the South (or Lick) Fork of the Pound. Here two children were born and died and were buried on a hill back of the house in coffins hewn from poplar logs. Here he planted the first apple trees ever set out in Wise County. He had carried the scions across the mountains from North Carolina, in a gourd, which his father had used to carry powder in during his life as a soldier in the Revolution. This gourd is still in the possession of Benton Bolling, a great-great-grandson of the soldier, and great-grandson of Jeremiah. Here also, Jeremiah Bolling built a two room log house, intending to make it his home till death. But death caused him to change his mind. After the two first-born died, his wife was no longer satisfied there in sight of the little graves and he sold his claim here and moved across the dividing ridge and settled on the head of North Fork of Pound at present Flat Gap. Here he reared a large family, and here he died after a long life of struggle with the hardships of the wilderness. After he had established his home at Flat Gap he went far back on the slope of Pine Mountain and cleared up a small field and planted it in corn every year as long as he lived, but never made any attempt to harvest the crop. This field was planted to attract bear, deer and other game to the field where he would shoot his supply of meat. This field, now grown up in undergrowth in a wild uninhabited part of Pine Mountain is known as the "Jerry Field." Source of Information: William Bolling, B. J. Bolling. Notes collected in my library.

The First Settlement of Benjamin Bolling

Location: Five miles southwest of Wise. On State Road 620. East side, fifty yards from highway. Three miles north of Esserville. Date: 1794. Owners: Settled by Benjamin Bolling. Sold by Bolling to an unknown settler. Surveyed by Alexander Gray. Major Harvey Gray 1880-1915. Daniel Joseph Bolling 1915-1937. Description: Described by descendants of Benjamin Bolling as a small one-room round-pole cabin. History: Benjamin Bolling came from North Carolina in 1794 and settled just south of the mouth of Rocky Fork of Guest River. While living here, Mrs. Bolling was attacked by a panther at the spring one morning and she fought the animal off with a piggin until her husband ran to her rescue and shot the panther. After living here about two years, Bolling sold his claim for a rifle gun and two hound pups and went back to North Carolina. Later he returned with his son, Jeremiah Bolling, and settled on the Pound.

The Bolling Powder Gourd

Location: On the Pound-Flat Gap Road. Three miles east of Flat Gap at the home of Benton Bolling. Date: About 1772. Description: Ordinary yard or garden variety of gourd. About 10 inches across bottom (blossom end), flat, with handle (stem) cut off about three inches long, into which powder was poured or loaded into rifle. It is highly polished by age and is chocolate brown in color. History: Benjamin Bolling was a soldier in the American Army of the Revolution. He prepared this gourd to carry his powder in so as to keep it dry. He prepared a deer skin bag or covering for the gourd to protect it from breading, and this covering is still on it. When he made his second and final journey into what is now Wise County, to establish a home, he carried a few scions in this powder gourd tied to the horn of his saddle all the miles across the mountains from North Carolina to the head of the Lick Fork of Pound, where he used them to plant the first orchard in Wise County. That was about 125 years ago and some of the trees are still living and bear annual crops of fruit. On Benjamin Bolling's death in 1835, the gourd fell to his son Jeremiah Bolling. He faithfully preserved it until his death about 1860, when it became possessed by Amos Bolling, Jeremiah's son, and his son, John, fell heir to it and at his death in 1935, it came into the hands of his son, Benton Bolling. It has been used in recent years to store bean seed and other garden seed in. Source of Information: Benton Bolling, William Bolling. Notes furnished me by the late William D. McNiel.
From the research of Michael Butler Mikey0529@columbus.rr.com
Death: --Not Shown--
Burial: --Not Shown--
Change: Date: 24 JUN 2003
Time: 11:26:03

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Felts, Pattie or Molly (b. 1736, d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
Time: 11:28:24

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Bolling, Justice (b. 1751/1760, d. 1841)
Death: 1841 Shelby Gap, Pike Co, KY
Change: Date: 24 JUN 2003
Time: 11:39:07

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Bolling, Benjamin II (b. 25 APR 1754, d. Abt 1819)
Death: Abt 1819 Clay Co, KY
Change: Date: 24 JUN 2003
Time: 11:27:41

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Boling, William "Blackwater Bill" (b. 1755, d. Bef 1830)
Note: 1810 Kentucky Census Clay County
William Boling 2 0 2 0 1 - 2 1 0 1 0 - 0
Death: Bef 1830
Change: Date: 24 JUN 2003
Time: 11:09:58

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Bolin, Robert (b. 1755/1756, d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
Time: 11:28:25

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Bolin, John (b. 1758, d. ?)
Change: Date: 24 JUN 2003
Time: 11:01:52

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Boling, Barnett (b. 1755/1761, d. ?)
Change: Date: 3 OCT 2002
Time: 11:28:25

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Boling, James (b. 9 JAN 1756, d. ?)
Note: There is no proof that James Bowling married a Blevins. He was a resident of Tennessee before his family arrived and settled in Clay county, Ky. Some researchers list James as the son of John Bolling II, some as the son of Benjamin Bolling and a brother of Rev. Jesse Bowling. He was a resident of Hawkins County Tenn in the late 1790's. I do have a list of children that were supposedly born to James and Sarah "Sally" Blevins.
Catherine "Kate"
Mary "Mollie"
Levi
Nancy
Eli "Bad Eli"
Christopher
James
Joseph
Change: Date: 7 DEC 2002
Time: 11:36:53

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